New workout – Goal race pace long run

7986

I’ve been recently thinking about it and this morning completed a new workout that I plan to add to my usual schedule. Once a month I aim to complete a goal race pace long run to complement my other training.

During a race preparation training cycle I will complete my three key workouts which are intervals for speed, hills for strength, and a long run for endurance. These three key workouts are complemented by aerobic runs aiming to let the body recover and rest days.

The goal pace long run I have designed into my schedule to give a fitness test of where I am currently and also build confidence. Whilst regular, weekly long runs are completed slower at an aerobic pace to build endurance this run will have a different purpose. The goal pace long run will reach a maximum distance of close to 3/4 of the race distance. With my next goal race being the Canberra marathon I will build this run to around 32km run at goal pace. My normal long run will continue to build to about three hours.

This morning I began putting this run in my schedule with a half marathon. With my goal in Canberra to beat my marathon personal best of 2:57, I aimed this for my goal pace to be slightly better than this at 2:55 marathon pace of 4:09 min/km.  You can see from my Strava file below that I went a bit quicker than this at 4:03 min/km. I was slightly ahead of my goal pace with 5km to go and decided to pick up the pace and finish strongly.

IMG_1951.jpg

During my current run streak I am running at the moment, (currently at day 25) I have kept all of my runs aerobic and forgotten about pace except for a parkrun last weekend. Whilst forgetting about pace I have built my aerobic fitness and today’s run was aimed to test my progress during this run streak. I felt strong this morning and was comfortable at this pace throughout the run. Whilst any marathoner knows that the pace they hold through halfway should feel comfortable, it was good for the confidence to be able to run this pace without any focussed training over the last month.

Recently I have made a decision to not focus on pace during my runs, this was still a factor during this run and will be moving forward. I kept my watch only on the time setting of my run this morning and only looked at pace as it told me each kilometre split. This gave me the ability to focus on effort throughout the run, trying to remain consistent and evenly pace the run. This is a learned skill that every runner should concentrate on, being able to run a goal pace is great, but being able to recognise the effort it takes to run your goal pace and consistently run the pace is much more valuable.

Post Christmas, in fact 8th January marks 14 weeks to my next marathon and the time my focussed training will begin. During this time my training will focus on my three key runs every week , aerobic recovery, rest and every month a race pace long run. I believe this run adds value to my training and gives a platform to improve on my marathon result. In early December I’ll build on to todays run and extend the distance by a few kilometres and give myself a marker of progress from November to December.

Do you have a run in your schedule to test your fitness?

 

 

Yes, you can go running without technology

Its taken me two runs to confirm what I already knew. You can run without technology dictating your running and you will most likely enjoy your running more. With the decision made to let go of the reins on technology and run only with feel I set my watch with one data field set on time during my runs over the last two days.  I am wearing the watch simply to track how long I run for and afterwards to track my distance run over my 30 day run streak period.  While the jury is still out on whether it is better to divorce from technology completely, there are certainly signs to suggest it could be beneficial.

Whilst not focussed on pace, you’ll automatically focus your run on feel and effort. Focussing on feel and effort allows you to not be a slave to the watch and the pace you are trying to stick to. If you feel good you will likely run faster, if you feel a bit off it’s likely you’ll slow down. However you’ll understand how you feel from the effort you put into each step of the run.

If you are not tracking pace, you’ll look at your watch a whole lot less. This is allows you to focus on running and being outside. Enjoy the scenery, fresh air and the reasons why you enjoy running in the first place. I’m guessing you didn’t start running so you could look at your watch, be easier to do this at the pub with a cold beer.

Looking at pace may in fact slow your progress towards your goals. You may be capable of running much faster then what you think and sticking to your goal pace may be limiting you. Run with feel and put in your best effort and who knows how fast you can go.

Take a break from technology, you don’t have to completely stop looking at pace but choose some runs to simply enjoy running and teach yourself to run with feel.

Stop looking at your watch and you may see some beautiful scenery out there.

The top 4 reasons you should be barefoot running

2016-09-16-10-42-47

While barefoot running has faded somewhat from the mass media attention it was receiving a few years ago there are still some very valid reasons why you should be running barefoot.

By barefoot running we mean running without shoes or in minimal footwear. By minimal footwear we mean shoes with the following attributes. Low heel to toe differential or heel drop, wide toe box and less cushioning and flexible materials. There are many different minimal footwear options available today.

Transitioning to barefoot running takes time. If you try to rush the process, you may suffer injuries in the calves or achilles. Be sure not to rush the process, it may take months or even years. Once your transition is complete your running will benefit.

The four top reasons you should be barefoot running are;

  1. Reduced injuries

Once you have transitioned to barefoot running you will likely run lighter, with a forefoot landing over a bent knee. This will ensure that you suffer less lower limb related injuries related to running. While barefoot running is not a panacea to injury free running it will go a long way to helping you run consistently more without injuries. Cushioned shoes won’t stop you getting injured, most likely they are the cause.

     2. Stronger feet

Running in an inflexible, cushioned shoe will inhibit the natural movement of your foot. The shoe does the work which the foot is designed to do, this will weaken your feet over time. Running barefoot or in flatter, more flexible footwear will build strength in your feet and lower limbs.  With strong feet comes a strong platform to run successfully and run injury free.

    3 Better awareness

” The more minimal you are the more aware you are” Chris McDougall

With more awareness comes better ground feel. While running you will become more aware of your posture,  foot landing, surroundings and effort. More awareness of your foot landing means you will be aware of every step and how and what you land on. This is a key reason why accomplished barefoot runners can run injury free as their awareness for where their foot lands is greater. Simply put running barefoot allows for more sensory feedback which increases awareness.

    4. Get faster

Forefoot running is faster than heel striking, pretty simple. Landing on your heel with a straight leg gives a braking effect, landing on your forefoot with a bent leg is faster and a more efficient way to run. If you want to get faster barefoot running can help you achieve this.

Transitioning to barefoot running is important, be patient and don’t rush the process however slow it may be. Once you successfully transition you will be free of heavy, inflexible running shoes and your running will become transformed.

If you wear traditional cushioned running shoes and have suffered injuries, it’s time to rethink your running footwear. Taking them off or replacing them with minimal shoes could be the answer.

 

 

 

 

The first week of a streak

When I committed to a run streak last Tuesday I made a goal to run all my runs outside and not let the treadmill in my garage allow me to avoid any inclement weather. Running in the rain is a part of running and usually not bad once you get started, especially in October in Australia where the weather is starting to warm up before summer.

During the first seven runs of my run streak I have run 63km over the seven days. All of them at an aerobic pace and all of them forgetting pace on the watch. Longest run has been 11.7km and shortest was this morning at 6km in heavy rain. The first four days of my running were in Sydney where I was having a short holiday and used these runs to explore the northern suburbs of Chatswood, Artarmon and Willoughby as this is where we were staying. Running in different surrounds allowed me to find some new trails around this area and was a nice change of scenery. There is some great running terrain around these areas which I wasn’t aware of before.

My challenge of not avoiding rain may have jinxed me to some degree as three of the first seven runs have been held in relatively heavy rain. My last run in Sydney was wet, my Saturday run including my local parkrun was wet and this morning was particularly wet. For this mornings run I had just gotten out of bed and started getting ready to run when the rain started making a jinx even more believable. Good to get the job done in the rain though, on a normal week I may have skipped some or all of these runs and stayed in bed.

I am back to Sydney this week for work on Wednesday which may cause a challenge fitting my run in. With an early 6:30am flight I’ll either be up very early to run or running later in the evening after dinner. I’m leaning towards a late evening run backed up by an early morning run on Thursday. Otherwise the normal challenges of work and life are present but I’m confident they won’t get in the way of my continuing the streak.

This is now a run streak

When I woke up this morning and went for my morning run I hadn’t planned it being the beginning of anything. I’m in Sydney for a few days and i just woke up and went for a run. Later in the day it came to me to start a run streak, there were two good reasons;

  1. I’ve never tried one before
  2. Why not?

I’ve given myself a short term goal of 30 days – 17th October to 17th November and a long term goal of 100 days 17th October to January 25th. We will start with plan A of 30 days and see how it goes till November 17th.

A couple of self administered rules;

  1. Minimum run is 5km
  2. All runs are outside ( no treadmills)

One other thing I’m going to concentrate on for at least the first 30 days is to keep all the runs aerobic. 30 days without hard training, all my runs will be easy aerobic efforts designed to be relaxed running and enjoy what it is about running that I love. The aim is to reconnect with running and enjoy my running, nature and the outdoors. It’s not that I need a jolt of motivation, just that I want to try something slightly different.

I would like to have less reliance on technology during this time. I am not currently training for a race, there is no need to monitor my pace and complete any specific training aimed to peak for a race. Therefore there is no need to look at my pace for any of the runs and just enjoy 30 days of relaxed running. For these 30 days I will wear my watch, however set it to not show me pace or distance through the runs. The only data to measure is time and later distance as I log my miles for the streak period. I have a belief that most runners including myself are over reliant on technology and this has taken away some of the simple joys of running.

The reason i’ve chosen to avoid treadmills during this time is to harden my resolve in times of poor weather. It’s time to get tougher, no hiding from the weather.

I’m looking forward to noticing what I learn from a 30 day run streak and whether i can continue further than this. Something often gets in the way to stop us running even when the best intentions are there. I’m also looking forward to how I react to a different, more relaxed form of training during this time.

Have you ever attempted a run streak?

If so, how did you go?

me5xq-21827_184x184.jpg.html

 

 

My week in running

My running week was mostly casual and relaxed with five runs completed for 41km overall all completed in my hometown. Started the week on Tuesday with a solid interval session, decided to break my intervals into two sets of 6 x 2 min with 1 min recovery, this gave me five minutes of easy running between the first and the second set which worked out fine and allowed me to push through to the end of the second set harder.

Most of the week saw me complete aerobic runs over a variety of runs with an undulating terrain. Didn’t have a specific hill session so added some hills to my aerobic runs for some variety. On Saturday morning I abandoned my aerobic run after 4km after being in a wild lightning storm, probably wasn’t in too much danger but for a short aerobic run I didn’t feel the risk was worth the reward.

I’m not normally a big fan of tempo runs during race training blocks as I feel I get more value from other training. However I decided to run a tempo on Sunday and went through a 2km warm up, 3km at 4:10min/km, 2km easy and 4km at 4:10 min/km. This run felt good and I enjoyed the tempo run for some variety. It might be something I revisit during my next marathon training block on semi regular occasions.

Mixed my footwear up for all these runs with Gladsoles trail sandals, Carson footwear Iguana racers and Salming Race 3 all being used during the week. Really enjoy the difference nuances of running with different footwear throughout the week.

There were a couple of performances on the international stage which really caught my eye over the weekend too. Both inspiring performances, one to win the world championship and another a rising star of Australian running.

Patrick Lange at the Ironman World championships in Hawaii, to run 2:39:59 for the marathon and run from 11th off the bike to not only win the world championship but break the course record was an outstanding achievement. Most of us don’t know what running a 2:40 marathon which is averaging 3:47 min/km or 6:06 min/mi feels like, it’s quick by any standards but at the end of an ironman is even more impressive.

Celia Sullohern won the Melbourne marathon in Australia on Sunday and ran 2:29. this is impressive running for a 24 year old. Into the top 10 all time Australian womens marathon times and putting her hand up for a Commonwealth Games birth on the Gold Coast early next year.

Hope you had a happy week of running.

 

Here are some places I ran this week.

New goals – Canberra Marathon 2018

With my race season likely to be coming to an end for the remainder of the year, it’s a time to plan for some new goals to train for in the beginning of 2018. One race that I have wanted to do again for a while has been the Canberra marathon and I am going to plan this as my first major goal race for 2018.

Canberra marathon is a race that I have done before but a long time ago. I ran the Canberra marathon in 2002, it was my second marathon and to date on a road marathon course it’s my personal worst marathon time. It was a day that I learnt how much the marathon distance can humble you. I had run the Sydney marathon as my first marathon the previous year and everything went to plan, in training and on race day. On my journey to Canberra I suffered injury setbacks in training and was nowhere near as fit or ready as the previous marathon in Sydney.

On race day I was still aiming to give myself a chance at a sub 3 hour marathon and raced the first half of the race accordingly. After 10-15 minutes of running the heavens opened and the rest of the race was run in torrential rain, this was not the end of the world and we dealt with that as it came. By 30km my poor preparation and over ambitious race goal was starting to bring me undone and the last 10 km of this race was a lonely place. I made it to the finish line in what today is still my worst marathon result. it’s a marathon that I will remember for just how hard the marathon is when the ‘wall’ gets to you and just how humbling this felt at the time.

A long time has passed since my one and only attempt at the Canberra marathon. It’s time for the Canberra marathon to be a focus race again. When I arrive in Canberra, 16 years after my first attempt there my goal will be the same, a sub 3 hour marathon is again the prize that i’ll be after. This time I will be better equipped to achieve it, having done it this year in Seoul I am confident that I can get my body ready to do it again. I am also confident that my race strategy will be better and I’ll give myself a good chance of achieving this goal. Secretly I’d like to go a bit quicker, 2:57 in Seoul was my perfect result there, but maybe I can go a bit quicker than that.

What I’ve learnt in the years since my first Canberra marathon is the importance of pacing your race. Back in 2002 I didn’t have a GPS watch, I had a stopwatch and looked at the time when I passed each kilometre marker and then did a quick mathematical equation to work out each kilometre split.  What running in those time did was teach me to pace my run by perceived effort rather then the watch, it’s something I still do in all races and just use the watch as measuring stick to track my progress.

I’ve also learnt to respect the marathon distance every time you run it. If you go into a marathon and think it’ll be easy because your last race went so well, it’ll kick your arse. Every marathon is a new experience, a new journey where you start from zero and end at 42.2km. In 2002 I expected to run well because I had run well in Sydney six months earlier, I expected it to be easy. It wasn’t.

Looking forward to finishing my year with some enjoyable running before knuckling down at the start of 2018 and getting ready for another crack at the Canberra marathon in April 2018. This time I’ll be ready.

IMG_1433

Three things every runner can learn from Kipchoge’s Berlin marathon

Kipchoge Splits

 

Most of us can’t imagine running anywhere near as fast as Eliud Kipchoge did in the Berlin marathon last weekend. 2:03:33 was a mere 36 seconds outside the world record averaging 2:56 per/km. An average pace that most of us struggle to be able to run at , let alone hold it for any amount of time.

There is some valuable lessons to be learnt from Kipchoge’s race that every marathoner can take away though.

  1. Consistent splits from 1 – 42Km

41 of Kipchoge’s splits were between 2:51 -3:01 per km. Only kilometre 40 at 3:09 was outside this 10 second parameter meaning his control in being able to run at a consistent pace is amazing. Although he has pace makers setting the pace he understands that to run his best race he will need to run 42 very consistently fast kilometres. Every runner in any distance can learn from this by pacing their race consistently.

Kipchoge doesn’t go too fast early in the race he is patient and disciplined and runs every moment of the race strategically. If you want to run your best on marathon day run consistently from the start to the finish.

2. Marathons get hard near the end.

Even for the greatest marathoner in the world it is evident that the marathon distance shows in the last 10km. Six of his last 10km are slower than his overall average of 2:56 min/km. He is able to work hard and doesn’t lose much time but over the last 10km is where Kipchoge loses touch with the world record.

Anyone whose run a marathon knows how hard the last 10 km can be. What doesn’t happen to Kipchoge is he doesn’t pay in the last 10km for going too fast early in the race and even still it gets very tough.

3. Drafting runners will help

From Breaking 2 to Berlin Kipchoge was three minutes slower. The advantage he was able to use during his breaking 2 attempt in using the arrowhead pacers available cannot be understated. It created a significant advantage that Kipchoge didn’t have in Berlin. When an average runner goes to a large city marathon they should take advantage of the crowd and use them to pace their race. Running within a pack of runners may greatly increase your chances of running your best time as long as the pack is running consistent splits.

Obviously we all don’t have the ability to have a team of pacers taking us through each marathon we enter but using the crowd to your advantage may assist you run a personal best.

We all may not run as fast as Kipchoge, but using the methods of the best may just help you run faster.

 

 

NIKE Men’s Zoom Fly, Ice Blue/Blue Fox, 9 M US


New From: $199.97 USD In Stock

Running without racing.

IMG_1201

Last Sunday’s marathon was the culmination of training towards a goal race and despite the challenges that unfolded during the race I am happy with my overall effort. This race was the culmination of 14 weeks training which is my normal plan for a marathon or longer race.

Last Sunday’s marathon was also likely the culmination of my racing year, with not many races left before the end of the year and certainly very few close to home. This means it’s time to switch gears with my training and enjoy my running with less focussed training towards trying to peak for a race. At times not having a race to train for has been a time when my running has suffered. I have struggled with the lack of focus and specificity and too much ice cream and skipped runs.

These days I have running without racing plans which keep me running regularly and enjoying my running without the pressure and challenge of a race in the not too distance future. This plan starts with continuing to run a similar amount of times per week and using variety in my running to keep focussed.

During October I plan to continue with my three key workouts each week, these are hill repeats, intervals and the long run however each will have far less focus. Hills will likely be similar, intervals shorter with more recovery and the long run shorter and not building time each week. Continuing to focus on these runs will keep my fitness ready for when my next race preparation starts. In addition to these will see some varying terrain and locations to keep my running interesting. to add variety I like using a weighted vest for some short runs, or efforts during runs. Skipping an aerobic run for a weighted vest hike is another option for easy days.

Adding variety can also be done by changing up footwear. As the weather gets warmer I like to use my favourite running location, the beach for some barefoot intervals and aerobic runs. GladSoles Sandals will still be my go to footwear for most of my runs though. And I will use my Carson footwear trail shoes for when I want some variety. These are the best shoes I’ve run in without socks, which is great for the beach and when the weather is hot.

The main focus while I’m running without racing is enjoy my running, add variety that isn’t achieved when training for a race and relax without the pressure of training hard.

Summer in Australia it’s certainly the best time to be outdoors enjoying the place we live. It’s a great time for relaxed running and enjoying the surrounds. I’m looking forward to running without the need for racing for the next few months, and enjoying my running.

 

Marathon training week 14 – Race week

 

Marathon training this week hasn’t quite gone to plan with my foot ‘injury’ coming at a time when I wanted to put in a couple more quality session before the race next Sunday. Only managing two runs this week, one of which was my interval session on Tuesday which I traded hills for intervals just because I felt like running fast when I woke up. This run went well, I felt strong and fast throughout and put down some solid work. I had planned to run the hills session on Thursday as straight swap but it didn’t eventuate. Friday I ran a 30 min aerobic run to test out the foot and it felt pretty good.

The foot however was sore after my aerobic run and is still sore enough today to give me a small amount of concern. This week I go into the week with no plan of when I will run, I am going to see how the foot feels and if it is still sore later in the week then I may not run until the race itself. At the moment it’s only a small amount of pain but after both my runs last week the pain was quite a bit worse.

Normally on race week I’d like a couple of aerobic runs to keep the legs moving and short interval session to keep myself sharp. This taper will be different and I may be susceptible to an increase in taper tantrums.

If I don’t run until the race I am not terribly concerned, I am happy with the amount of long training I have been able to do during this preparation and whilst I don’t feel as fit any ready as my last marathon in Seoul earlier this year I feel good enough to give my best and push myself.

This week will now be about rest, if the foot doesn’t have any pain I will run later in the week and sharpen myself up a bit. If it does have pain I’ll rest and see what happens on race day.

Either way I will be fresh and ready to go for the race next Sunday.

Marathon training this week hasn’t quite gone to plan this week with my foot ‘injury’ coming at a time when I wanted to put in a couple more quality session before the race next Sunday. Only managing two runs this week. One being an interval session on Tuesday when I traded hills for intervals just because I felt like running fast when I woke up. This run went well, I felt strong and fast throughout and put down some solid work. I had planned to run the hills session on Thursday as straight swap but it didn’t eventuate. Friday I ran a 30 min aerobic run to test out the foot and it felt pretty good.

The foot however was sore after my aerobic run and is still sore enough today to give me a small amount of concern. This week I go into the week with no plan of when I will run, I am going to see how the foot feels and if it is still sore later in the week then I may not run until the race itself. At the moment it’s only a small amount of pain but after both my runs last week the pain was quite a bit worse.

Normally on race week I’d like a couple of aerobic runs to

Marathon training this week hasn’t quite gone to plan with my foot ‘injury’ coming at a time when I wanted to put in a couple more quality session before the race next Sunday. Only managing two runs this week, one of which was my interval session on Tuesday which I traded hills for intervals just because I felt like running fast when I woke up. This run went well, I felt strong and fast throughout and put down some solid work. I had planned to run the hills session on Thursday as straight swap but it didn’t eventuate. Friday I ran a 30 min aerobic run to test out the foot and it felt pretty good.

The foot however was sore after my aerobic run and is still sore enough today to give me a small amount of concern. This week I go into the week with no plan of when I will run, I am going to see how the foot feels and if it is still sore later in the week then I may not run until the race itself. At the moment it’s only a small amount of pain but after both my runs last week the pain was quite a bit worse.

Normally on race week I’d like a couple of aerobic runs to keep the legs moving and short interval session to keep myself sharp. This taper will be different and I may be susceptible to an increase in taper tantrums.

If I don’t run until the race I am not terribly concerned, I am happy with the amount of long training I have been able to do during this preparation and whilst I don’t feel as fit any ready as my last marathon in Seoul earlier this year I feel good enough to give my best and push myself.

This week will now be about rest, if the foot doesn’t have any pain I will run later in the week and sharpen myself up a bit. If it does have pain I’ll rest and see what happens on race day.

Either way I will be fresh and ready to go for the race next Sunday.

keep the legs moving and short interval session to keep myself sharp. This taper will be different and I may be susceptible to an increase in taper tantrums.

If I don’t run until the race I am not terribly concerned, I am happy with the amount of long training I have been able to do during this preparation and whilst I don’t feel as fit any ready as my last marathon in Seoul earlier this year I feel good enough to be able to give my best and push myself.

This week will now be about rest, if the foot doesn’t have any pain I will run later in the week and sharpen myself up a bit. If it does have pain I’ll rest and see what happens on race day.

Either way I will be fresh and ready to go for the race next Sunday.

 

IMG_1113IMG_1201

IMG_0295

North Brother Mountain – The finish of Beach to Brother marathon is atop here next week