Marathon Training: The halfway point

You’re at the half way point of your marathon training program, so where should your training be and how should you feel? If you’ve completed all or most of your key sessions as designed you’ll be feeling fit, strong and motivated to get to the marathon start line.

Long Runs

With 7-8 long runs under your belt you will have developed a good endurance base and strong aerobic capacity. Running for over two hours at your long run pace should feel comfortable and dare I say relatively easy. This is why we run weekly long runs so that running for long periods feels comfortable. At this stage in your training you should have built to your maximum long run time or distance, your base endurance training is almost completed. One of the great feelings from regular long runs is the bodies adaptation to endurance. As the body adapts to regular increases in the long run distances, the distances that were difficult early in your marathon training now feel easy.

Over the next 5-6 weeks before a taper you can add some quality marathon specific training to your long runs. These can consist of race pace efforts during a long run. A favourite session is on a 30km long run to include 4 x 5km at race pace in the middle of the run with a 1-2km recovery between each. You can easily structure a long run session on a similar theme but add race paced efforts during the middle or finish the long run this way and really build your resistance to fatigue at your race pace.

Hill Sessions

Half way through the marathon program you will be strong from regular hill sessions. These sessions have given you the leg strength to be able to feel stronger as you fatigue during your longer runs. This strength will be vital in the later stages of the marathon when running gets tough. Over the next 5-6 weeks hill sessions we recommend continuing completing hill sessions weekly and ensuring a strong body on marathon day.

On top of the long runs and hill sessions, the two most key base marathon fitness sessions the interval and aerobic runs you’ve completed will have assisted in building a really strong fitness base. As mileage has increased over these 7-8 weeks as has a solid aerobic capacity. People whose marathon training has gone to plan to this point could quite easily run a good marathon this weekend.

The second half

For the second half of the marathon training you will most likely want a 10-14 day taper at the end. If you are on a 16 week marathon cycle this leave six weeks of training before the race taper. From this period you can focus more on race specific training and less on building your endurance and strength.

The three key sessions won’t change too much but the focus shifts slightly to long runs that incorporate race pace, intervals that are shorter at a slightly higher intensity and hill sessions that are shorter. The focus in this period will give intervals the priority over hills. This is reversed from the first half of training when building strength was a great priority then speed. This is because your strength base is now built and we shift to getting ready to running your fastest on marathon day.

Remember you don’t need to become a faster runner to run a faster marathon, you need to stop getting tired and run your best at the end of the marathon. Therefore long runs should be run throughout the training program and will always be the most valuable run of each week.

If you are feeling this way at half way then you should be confident that you are on track for the marathon start line and  a good performance. Stay motivated and keep working hard and you’ll achieve your race goals in your marathon.

 

Interview with a runner – Melissa Ensink

 

Melissa Ensink is a runner from Melbourne, Australia and a six time marathon finisher. Melissa is also an accomplished yoga teacher and vegan. Melissa recently ran the Canberra marathon in April and is currently training for her home marathon in Melbourne in October.

Melissa has personal best times at the following distances;

Marathon PB – 3:54:58

30km PB – 2:33:30

Half marathon PB – 1:45:08

10km PB – 48:24

5km PB – 23:45

 

How long have you been running, and how did you start?

I was always a runner back in school, from as early as grade 3 I was competitive in athletics and cross country. My events were 100m, 200m and 4 x 100m relay. I also did cross country and although ‘long distance’ running wasn’t a natural gift, I did okay and was a part of a pretty successful cross country team in secondary school. This was mainly due to two of the runners in our team being very competitive at state and national levels. For a few of my teenage years, back in my home town, I was also a boundary umpire for the local football leagues. At the time, I loved footy and thought it was the best thing to get paid to run and watch footy – even if it was raining. After school I didn’t continue any formal training and just ran to keep fit and healthy and also for the positive mental health effects.

I decided I wanted to run a half marathon back in 2012 but after I injured my knee playing netball, I didn’t get around to this until August 2013 – Sandy Point Half Marathon. My training consisted of running one or two of the same loops near my house, and timing it with a fake purple Casio watch I got in Thailand for $3. After that I got more focused on my running, bought my first Garmin watch, completed a proper training plan and ran my first marathon.

What running achievement are you most proud of?

Finishing the Honolulu Marathon is my favourite running memory to date and I was proud to just finish. My training went really well but a few weeks out I injured my hip and was barely able to walk! With the right rest and guidance, I was able to run again and complete the marathon. It wasn’t fast and certainly not pain free but totally worth it.

What is your biggest tip to becoming a successful runner?

For me it is being organised and having a structured plan. If I haven’t set out what I will do for the week, I probably won’t do it. I like to know in advance what mileage I am shooting for and what workouts I will do.

If I am not training for a particular race, things are less structured but I still have a general idea of what I would like to do that week or phase. Mixing up training and events to keep things interesting is also important.

What is your favourite training session?

At the moment I am enjoying kilometre repeats. for example: 2km warm up, 4x1km @10km or HM pace (depending on the day) with 0.5km easy in between. 2km cool down. Distance and pace might vary depending on the day or where I am in the training cycle.

How do you stay motivated when you don’t want to run?

Instead of relying on motivation, I am clear on my ‘why’, make the commitment to my goals and my training and stay disciplined in this pursuit. In an ordinary week, I would say half the time I am super motivated and pumped to run, and the rest of the time I would rather do other things. But I know that the work has to be done to get closer to my goals. I also tell myself when I can’t be bothered running that I will feel so much better afterwards which always ends up being true!

What are your favourite running shoes?

I used to love the Mizuno Sayonara but they’ve stopped making them. So I am on the lookout for a new favourite. This year I am testing the Asics Cumulus and Nike Lunarglide.

What are your goals for the future?

My overall goal is to be running for as long as I can, hopefully into old age. Right now my main goal is to run the Boston Marathon, so I am trying to get a qualifying time in the next 6-8 months. I would also like to run a marathon in every state in Australia and on every continent of the world.

Thanks for taking the time out of your schedule for this interview Melissa. If you wish to keep up to date with Melissa on her running journey you can follow her at pranarunning or on instagram also at pranarunning. Thanks again Melissa and good luck in the future.

 


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Goals of the first month of marathon training

 

A month into your marathon training program how should your fitness have progressed? A standard marathon program duration is usually 14-16 weeks giving you basically three months of training and a two week taper before your race.

In this initial month the goal should be two fold;

  • Increase your endurance
  • Increase muscular strength

This first month or even longer can be considered your base phase of training where you work on these two goals. We have spoken in depth about increasing your mileage to increase your endurance, this is a fundamental goal in the base phase of marathon training. You can build your mileage and endurance through regular aerobic workouts and stretching your long run time each week.

During the first month of the marathon base is the time to increase muscular strength, incorporating hills into training is essential for this development. Ensuring you complete your weekly hill session as well as running regular aerobic runs over hilly terrain should be increased during base training phase. This increase will build strength for when you do longer or more challenging interval and tempo sessions later in the training. Simply put running more over hills at an aerobic pace will develop both your endurance and strength.

If you use Strava or another online site to log your mileage you can focus on two metrics. Monitor your weekly mileage and elevation run. Your Strava profile will measure your last 4 weeks of running, focus on increasing this number during this period of training.

While the focus is on endurance and strength in this phase running a weekly interval session should still be completed. As part of the three weekly sessions it is recommended that an interval workout is run every week. During the base phase you can run longer intervals, the goal of intervals is usually to increase speed. However running a longer interval will give you an endurance pay off as well and teaching the body to be able to run fast as it fatigues. Being able to run fast through fatigue is a vital component of developing endurance for the marathon. At some stage in the marathon you’ll be asked to dig deep and stay on goal pace and these longer intervals and long runs are where you’ll teach yourself this skill.

After this first month of training you should be feeling comfortable with running the increased mileage you’ve developed. From here the recommendation is to continue to build the endurance through increasing long run distance, strength through hill workouts and more focussed speed through shorter, faster intervals. However you will need to recover from the harder workouts and you can run your aerobic runs on flatter terrain and possibly slower than the previous phase. After eight weeks of marathon training you should be reaching close to your maximum distance of your long run and be ready to build speed and strength to get you through the marathon. the value you’ll get from a quality base phase of marathon training will help you get through the hard training thats ahead and to the finish line of the marathon.

 

 

How to increase mileage without increasing injury

 

Recently in these pages we talked about the benefits of increasing your weekly mileage and how doing this can improve your overall running performance. For most runners a small increase in mileage in the short term will not greatly increase their chances of injury and if this increase turns into a consistent training variation the benefits outweigh the risk of injury.

The main injury risk associated with an increase in mileage is increasing beyond your capabilities. Therefore you should structure your mileage based on your recent running volume. Going from 40km per week to 80km in a week will have very little benefit if you cannot sustain the increase and need to go back to 40km after a week or two.

The best method of increasing is to develop a plan that will allow you to increase gradually and then sustain the new weekly volume. The easiest two strategies are;

  • Increase your easy runs by 5-10 min
  • Consistent long runs

Almost every runner can make 5-10 minutes more in their daily schedule to increase their run. This is fail safe plan against injury for most runners as the extra mileage will hardly be noticed. Only strategy needed is a commitment to get out the door for 5-10 minutes.

Long runs should be run consistently for any long distance runner, they are the staple run for improving endurance over time. Make time in your schedule every week to run long regardless of the period in your training program. The distance or time of these long runs can vary based on your ability, running background a goal races. Easy rule of thumb is to make your long run 25-30% of your total weekly mileage.

How rapidly you should increase mileage can vary from runner to runner. If you are new to running you will need to be patient, the body will take time to get used to the increase. If you have a history of injury then you should be cautious, this does not mean you can’t increase mileage but monitor yourself as you increase mileage. Remember the benefits will only be delivered if you can maintain the increase for a period of time, be patient.

If you are an intermediate or advanced runner with little history of injury then you can push greater mileage with confidence. Increase mileage to a point where you can maintain the increase for 3-4 weeks without suffering fatigue or burnout. If you do feel you are starting to burnout then you’ve increased too quickly and may need to plateau or decrease.

Incorporating regular rest days into your schedule will help you avoid burnout or fatigue. We recommend not planning rest days and using these when you feel you need to rest. This helps you avoid burnout and injury as you rest when the mind or body says no, and run when you are motivated, ready and willing.

When you increase mileage you should be attempting to create a new normal for yourself that over a period of weeks feels normal. Therefore you should only increase to what you feel you can capably sustain. If you achieve this you certainly give yourself a better chance of remaining injury free.

You’ll get great benefits over time by increasing your mileage, you’ll get even greater benefits over time by remaining injury free and enjoying your running.


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Running hills, Yes please

Running hills regularly is one sure fire way to improve your marathon result and almost all aspects of your running performance. Regular hill workouts will give you gains in strength, speed, endurance and injury prevention. Every runner will benefit from running hills no matter whether you started running last week or are a seasoned veteran.

Hills are a member of the three key sessions we recommend runners run each week. If you want to be a self coached runner and keep your training cycle simple, run a focused hill, interval and a long run each week mixed with aerobic recovery runs.

Whilst most marathons are run on flat courses designed to offer runners a chance at a fast time, the benefits from regular hills give you the chance to improve even further.

Hill Workouts

We are here to talk about hills today and why they should be a regular part of your training schedule. There are many ways to add hill running specifics into your runs but three simple and easy to additions are;

  • Hill sprints – Short explosive effort uphill followed by a downhill walk recovery. These are usually 10-15 second efforts and can be included at the end of an aerobic run.
  • Hill repeats – Run the hill with a focus on a medium hard effort followed by a recovery run down the hill. Varying the length, gradient and number of repeats can add variety to this session.
  • Hilly Tempo runs – Choose a hilly terrain and run a focussed tempo session over a hilly terrain for 45-60 minutes. To aide recovery during the run you can run the uphills harder then the downhills.

Running hills regularly builds leg strength specific to running which helps every aspect of your running. This gives you benefits of speed and endurance that are vital to improving your performance over every distance. Being stronger gives you a better chance to avoid injury.

If you are training for an upcoming marathon you should be running a hill repeat or hilly tempo at least weekly, particularly in the early phase of the training when you are building strength and your aerobic base fitness. Later in your program you may want to run sessions more specific to your goal race, but for at least the first eight weeks hills should be a weekly part of your life.

If you want to make hills part of your training schedule commit one day each week for hills. If you are new to hills start with hill sprints at the end of a run. When you feel ready add a more challenging specific hill session to your week, to start pick an easier hill for repeats before moving to steeper or longer hills. This session may just become your favourite session of the week.

 


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The benefits of increasing running mileage

“An unaimed arrow never hits it target”

This is also true when it comes to running and a structured plan to get the most out of your running mileage is important. Increasing running mileage helps develop your aerobic capacity so you are better able to handle harder sessions and also run faster over longer distances. Increasing running mileage helps you translate times over shorter distances to longer races. Theoretically if you can run 20 min for 5km you should be able to run a 3:15 marathon, however this doesn’t always happen and building aerobic capacity over time is what can make this a reality.

Benefits of more mileage

  • Building your aerobic capacity

Building your aerobic capacity means building your endurance. The most important factor in becoming a better distance runner. Most running programs feature a lot of aerobic running with harder workouts littered through them. Building aerobic capacity is the number one thing you can do to improve your running and the best way to do this is to increase your mileage at an aerobic pace.

  • Increasing running efficiency

Improving your aerobic capacity will like help you run more efficiently, meaning you’ll be able to run further or faster using less energy. The more you run the better more efficient runner you’ll become. Increasing running is not the only factor in improving running efficiency but certainly one.

  • Prepare you for fatigue in race

When you increase your mileage you deal with fatigue regularly when you train. Your weekly long run even when you are not in a preparation phase for a race is the best run to prepare you for race fatigue. You’ll be better prepared to deal with challenging periods of races when you’ve done greater mileage.

  • Build resilience and mental toughness

When you’ve done the hard work in training you are better equipped to deal with tough patches in races and become resilient and mentally tough. When it’s time to dig deep in a race it takes mental toughness to convince yourself you can still run your best. Mileage in the bank helps prepare you to be mentally tough.

  • Race faster

Quite simply the result of all the benefits listed is better racing results.

How to increase mileage

  • Have a structured plan

Think about the time you have available to run and structure your training around this time. Give yourself the best opportunity to fit running into your schedule.

  • Consistent long runs

Even when you are not in a race preparation phase you should complete a weekly aerobic long run. The most valuable run you will do to increase mileage and your aerobic capacity.

  • Increase runs by 5 – 10 minutes

Increasing your easy runs by 5-10 mins may give you 1-2km per run more which adds up over time. Will it really affect you if you set the alarm 10 minutes earlier.

  • Run an extra day per week

If you can fit an extra run into your schedule if you can. Keep this run as an easy recovery run rather then a rest day. The miles will help you in the long run. If you can’t fit another day in thats ok too.

There is no magic number on miles that every runner should be doing, this is individual and there are too many factors to list.  However almost everyone has the ability and can benefit from a small and measured increase in miles. Run well.


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3 Tips to improving your running performance

When looking to improve your running performance small changes can make a big difference. Here are three well tried tips to improve your running performance before your next race goal.

Mileage Matters

If you want to improve running one of the easiest things to do is increase mileage. Being able to run further in a race preparation will give you great benefits. This does not mean you need to run more hard sessions and the recommendation is to avoid these. Running more should be more running at an aerobic pace to build your aerobic capacity.

A few ways you can increase your mileage are;

Increase your easy runs by 5 – 10 min. If you run four easy runs per week this may mean you add 5-10km to your weekly mileage which doesn’t sound a lot but over a 16 week marathon preparation this could add 160km of aerobic building running to your fitness. Can be as easy as getting up 10 min earlier or not looking at your smartphone notifications that you’ve accumulated overnight until after your run and get out the door running earlier

Run an extra day a week or run twice a day. If you currently four days a week add a day and run five. If you have an opportunity in your schedule to at times run twice in a day, go for it. These extra miles you’ve run will be valuable when they add up. Only do these if you have the time in your schedule though, there is no need to force yourself out the door. It’s supposed to be fun and if it’s not then use the time to rest more

If you can use any of these ways to give yourself a small increase in your weekly miles they will help you over the long term.

 

Get Stronger

The pace required to run a 3 hour marathon is not difficult, for most runners the pace of 6:52 min/mile is a fast jog and easily manageable. What is very difficult though is running this pace for 26.2 miles and it takes strength to do this. Being able to run at a fast perceived pace when the body fatigues is what makes running difficult.

Building strength so that the body can perform at a high level through fatigue is often neglected yet vitally important. To improve strength we suggest a weekly hill repeats session and a strength program of both body weight and explosive weighted exercises.

Hill repeats are part of our recommended three key sessions that every runner should do weekly to build strength. Trying to run these on the same day each week will build them into a habit, that when repeated will become a part of your routine. Be ready to change up from time to time when life gets in the way. To get the best results this should be a hard session so do them when the body is well rested and ready to be stressed.

In terms of strength programs its best advised to consult a personal trainer in your area to recommend a strength program for you that incorporates running specific weight training and ensure you use the right technique to perform these exercises. A strength routine of 1-2 times a week should give you a great benefit to your running.

Correct training paces.

Speed work or interval sessions are supposed to be difficult. They are meant to challenge you so be prepared to run them hard.

Whether you aim to hit a certain pace or use perceived effort as a measure of intensity is up to you but be prepared for them to challenge you. If you intend to hit a pace use an online calculator to give you the correct paces to hit and go after them. These are designed to build speed, so they need to be specific to your ability and run accordingly.

Running interval sessions based on perceived effort will allow these to be purely individual but you’ll need to be honest with yourself when applying this effort. Be prepared to work hard and give your best effort.

Running these regularly will build speed and the ability to run a faster pace then comfortable when fatigued. Training at the correct pace for you gives you the best way to improve your speed quicker.

Until next time. Run well

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How to prepare for preparing for a marathon

Whether you are new to the marathon or a seasoned marathoner searching for a new personal best, being prepared for the training to come is essential. For some preparing for a marathon will simply mean increasing your mileage to prepare for the 42.2km on race day. While for others it will mean increasing mileage further than you’ve ever run and this may seem daunting. Here are three tips to do prior to your marathon training beginning to give you the best chance at a successful marathon training load.

1. Prepare to adjust your mileage

Whether you regularly run marathons or are preparing or your first you are likely to not be regularly doing marathon specific training. Being prepared to increase your mileage is important.

Is your body ready to cope with more mileage? With most coaches and runners structuring a 14-16 week marathon program you can use the 2-4 weeks before this begins to assess where your mileage is and begin to increase. Try and understand whether you are ready to increase your mileage. If you aren’t be mindful for the first half of the program and be cautious with every week that the total mileage or the long run gets significantly longer. The old rule of not increasing weekly mileage by more than 10% still applies and can be used to monitor. The weeks before the program begins are ideal weeks to set small goals to ensure you are prepared for your marathon preparation to start.

How will your life cope with an increase in mileage? Another aspect of preparing for a marathon is that you will likely spend more time running. Are your family and work life ready for the increase and how will you fit the extra time in

2. Prepare for your training paces

This tip is for those looking to run their best time in a marathon. In the weeks leading up to a marathon preparation to gauge where your fitness is currently and then prepare your interval or tempo workout goal paces around this current fitness levels.

In the weeks before your marathon preparation starts you can run a time trial over whatever distance you feel comfortable with 3-5km is perfect to gauge your fitness. From here you can use this time to enter into one of the many running calculators on the internet and gauge your times. In our opinion the McMillan Running calculator is the best available as it will give you individual training paces specific to your goal.

Using this information can be a great place to assess where your fitness is and what you need to do to do your best in your marathon.

3.Figure out your schedule

Whether you are accessing a quality running coach or self structuring your training having a schedule that fits into your life is crucial. To give you the best chance at your marathon fitting in the key workouts is important.

Scheduling how many days you plan to run and which days you will do your key workouts will give you the best shot at success. Making sure you have a plan in place for when you will run your long run and harder sessions each week. And also having a plan to reschedule if life or weather or other factors get in the way. Committing to and completing these sessions each week should be part of the schedule.

Figuring out your schedule is a vital piece of the puzzle to get you ready to run your best marathon.

 

 

There are many other things that form the pieces of a marathon preparation, these are just three that you can do prior to your scheduled training starting.

If you have any questions or comments on your own marathon training leave a comment.

 

Cheruiyot v Keitany: How important is marathon pacing?

A look at two of the leading protagonists in the London Marathon shows the importance of pacing to run your best marathon time. While Mary Keitany set out at world record pace in London, Vivian Cheruiyot ran a more controlled and consistent race to ultimately take the win.

A look at each ladies 5km splits tells the story.

                                            Keitany                                                  Cheruiyot

5km                               15:46                                                   16:15

10km                             16:00                                                   16:38

15km                             16:00                                                   16:25

20km                             16:04                                                   16:13

25km                             16:34                                                   16:25

30km                             16:39                                                   16:23

35km                             17:33                                                    16:29

40km                             19:47                                                    16:20

42.2km                          2:24:27                                                2:18:31

1st half/2nd half           67:16/77:11                                          68:56/69:35

These splits tell a story about both ladies, firstly a brave decision by Keitany to go out at world record pace and as the second fastest lady in history it is an obvious goal to break Paula Radcliffe’s world record. Also a brave decision by Cheruiyot not to go with Keitany and Dibaba through the first 5km and run her own pace. Cheruiyot is the current Olympic champion at 5000m running 14:29 to win in Rio so no doubt could have stayed with the lead pace. The decision to be controlled and run a consistent pace over the entire marathon paid dividends in the end.

At 20km Cheruiyot was 1:41 behind Keitany and from there she started to close the gap, overtaking Ketiany after 35km. Cheruiyot’s 39 sec positive split was run on a warm day in London. A very patient and well paced race by Cheruiyot, running a pace that she could consistently hold for the 42.2km from the start of the marathon till the end.

How can the average runner benefit Cheruiyot’s pacing example?

There are two lessons here that average runners can take away.

  1. Consistent pacing is the key

The best marathon results are achieved by consistent pacing throughout the entire marathon. Cheruiyot’s marathon in London is a perfect example of marathon pacing. Her first 5km split is just 5 sec faster then her 35-40km split when the race was there to win. To run a 40sec positive split on a warm day in a 5 minute personal best means she was controlled and patient early and gave her best effort in the latter stages of the race.

This strategy can be replicated by every runner trying to achieve their goals. Be patient and controlled and when the marathon asks for your best effort you’ll be in a position to give it.

2. Know your goal pace is achievable on the day

If consistent pacing throughout the marathon is the goal you need to know your goal is achievable. If your best marathon is a 3:35 then attempting to break 3 hours may be unachievable. You may be able to run 3 hour marathon pace for a good part of the marathon but when it gets tough your pace will ultimately fall away and the last quarter of the marathon is most likely a painful experience. Cheruiyot clearly didn’t believe she could run world record pace for 42.2km, she did believe she could run sub 2:20 and paced her race perfectly to do this and ultimately win the race.

The other part to this is adjusting your goal if the conditions aren’t ideal. It was warm in London and a lot of runners suffered on the day due to the heat. Perhaps Keitany should have adjusted her expectation with the warm weather. Adjust your goal if necessary.

Pacing is an important part of running to any distance, learning this skill and be realistic about your goals and paces can help you achieve your goals and ensure your enjoy your race day experiences.

happy pacing, happy running

Coolcore Multi Chill – Product Review

The Multi Chill by Australian brand Coolcore is a versatile, multi-functional headwear item suitable for all types of outdoor sports and leisure activities. Coolcore advertise 12 different ways that the Multi chill can be worn that offer a suitable headwear item for all climates. The secret to the Multi chill and the other products offered by Coolcore is the fabric which claims to use a technology to keep you cooler, drier and more comfortable with a competitive advantage. If you would like to know more about the technology in their fabric visit coolcore.com.au for more details, there is a comprehensive explanation of the technology in the fabric provided.

I have been testing the Multi Chill for 6-8 weeks on a variety of my runs over differing weather. I wanted to test the product on both hot and cooler days and see if the fabric really did cool me during my runs. During these runs I have  used the Multi Chill in a variety of the 12 styles however predominantly the sweatband, saharine and bandana styles.

The main question I wanted to answer was, does the fabric provide a cooling effect? From my first few runs wearing the Multi Chill it was apparent that this is true, I could feel the fabric cooling my head as my body started to heat. The result wasn’t a huge cooling effect but certainly enough to feel a noticeable difference when running. These initial runs were all in mild weather in the early morning.

Using the Multi Chill under hotter condition and runs under direct sunlight, I was surprised to find the cooling effect is greater then the milder conditions. This seems to be when the fabric performs best, during these runs as my body and head heated the fabric again provides the cooling effect. The feeling is not extreme, but rather a noticeable cooling of the head. This also has the benefit of you staying drier, as the Multi Chill absorbs sweat from running the head and hair definitely stay drier and helps keep you comfortable while running.

If you are looking at the Multi Chill or other products from Coolcore and expecting a huge cooling effect in hot conditions then you may be disappointed. However the fabric used by Coolcore will provide relief from the heat of the sun and the natural heating of the body during exercise.

Using the Multi Chill at night in cooler conditions is also a positive experience. Using in the bandana method allows for warmth in the beginning of the run and as the body heats up the head remains comfortable. I haven’t been able to use the Multi Chill in very cold conditions yet however I don’t see any problems as the Multi Chill can be worn in a way to provide warmth and also the fabric’s cooling will happen when the body heats during the run.

If you are looking for a multi-functional headwear item for running or other sporting activity, I don’t see any weakness in the Coolcore Multi Chill. The claims that Coolcore make in regards to their fabric are accurate and the Multi Chill is comfortable to wear for long periods of time. It’s a welcome addition to my running accessories collection

The Multi Chill sells for AUD $19.95 plus $6.95 shipping within Australia. This is well priced against other products in this space with not many staking claim to the cooling effect that Coolcore offers. Coolcore has a range of products all using the same fabric, check them out at coolcore.com.au for more details.

 

 

 

*Disclaimer: Coolcore provided a Multi Chill without charge for the purpose of this review.