Interview with a runner – Alasdair McGill

Alasdair McGill is a runner from Inchture, Scotland in the United Kingdom. Alisdair is an accomplished Professional Accountant and public speaker and is a relative late bloomer in the running world. In a short period of time he has completed a number of impressive races culminating in his first marathon at last years Loch Ness Marathon in Scotland.
Alasdair’s personal bests are;
10K- 46:09
Half- 1:45:42
Marathon- 4:01:59
How long have you been running, and how did you start?
I raced a bike for 10 years, towards the end I was racing cyclocross over the winter, and in cross you do a bit of running as part of your training. At the end of the 2014 season I decided to keep running and entered the Edinburgh half marathon. I’d never run before, so it was a big challenge, but I loved it and eventually did several races in 2015 including 2 half marathons.
However there was still a part of me that missed the bike, so in 2016 I spent more time riding & racing than running, but I got it out of my system. Since the Spring of 2017 I’ve been focused on running and hardly touched the bike!
What running achievement are you most proud of?
I ran my first marathon at the end of 2017, it was the hardest sporting thing I’ve ever done. My target time was 3:45, and I was on track until around mile 18 when the wheels came off. I limped round in 4:01. But I loved training for it, the anticipation and then the experience on the day. I’m looking forward to going sub-4 in 2019 when I’ll do my next one.
What is your biggest tip to becoming a successful runner?
It has to be consistency. As Des Linden says, keep showing up. Make running part of your daily routine, then it becomes something you just do. As well as making you a better runner, it will also make you a better human – it will keep you fit and is good for your mental health.
What is your favourite training session?
I do like a good tempo session. At the moment we’ve moved up to 3 x 10 minutes, after doing 4 x 8 minutes the past couple of weeks. These are good sessions that build endurance and get you used to harder efforts. I’d best describe them as sessions where you’re comfortably uncomfortable…..
How do you stay motivated when you don’t want to run?
It’s really not something I have a problem with. I rarely have mornings (I do most of my training at 6am), where I don’t want to get up, but when that does happen all I have to do is think about the goals I’ve set myself an that will get me up. I think goals are important in life, and certainly in sport. I’ve competed most of my life (it was golf until I started cycling), so I know that if I want to get better I have to put the work in.
What are your favourite running shoes?
I’ve always run in Brooks shoes. Bought my first pair from Run4It, the local running store and I’ve just stuck with them. I started our in Glycerins, had several pairs of those, had a pair of Ghosts, but they wore out too quickly. At the end of 2017 I bought a pair of Launch 4s, really liked them, so I’m now onto my 4th pair. I also have a pair of Brooks Hyperion racing flats that I use for 5k & 10k races.
What are your goals for the future?
I’m still a novice at this running lark, so it’s all about steady improvement. I’ll be 50 next year, and doing my second marathon, so I want to go sub 4 hours. Ideally 3:45. Beyond that, I simply want to stay injury-free and enjoy my running.

Ali documents his running and professional life in his blog at alasdairmcgill.com and his instagram @ali_mcgill. You can also follow his training on strava at Alasdair McGill.
Thanks for your time Alasdair and good luck with your future running goals.

How to increase mileage without increasing injury

 

Recently in these pages we talked about the benefits of increasing your weekly mileage and how doing this can improve your overall running performance. For most runners a small increase in mileage in the short term will not greatly increase their chances of injury and if this increase turns into a consistent training variation the benefits outweigh the risk of injury.

The main injury risk associated with an increase in mileage is increasing beyond your capabilities. Therefore you should structure your mileage based on your recent running volume. Going from 40km per week to 80km in a week will have very little benefit if you cannot sustain the increase and need to go back to 40km after a week or two.

The best method of increasing is to develop a plan that will allow you to increase gradually and then sustain the new weekly volume. The easiest two strategies are;

  • Increase your easy runs by 5-10 min
  • Consistent long runs

Almost every runner can make 5-10 minutes more in their daily schedule to increase their run. This is fail safe plan against injury for most runners as the extra mileage will hardly be noticed. Only strategy needed is a commitment to get out the door for 5-10 minutes.

Long runs should be run consistently for any long distance runner, they are the staple run for improving endurance over time. Make time in your schedule every week to run long regardless of the period in your training program. The distance or time of these long runs can vary based on your ability, running background a goal races. Easy rule of thumb is to make your long run 25-30% of your total weekly mileage.

How rapidly you should increase mileage can vary from runner to runner. If you are new to running you will need to be patient, the body will take time to get used to the increase. If you have a history of injury then you should be cautious, this does not mean you can’t increase mileage but monitor yourself as you increase mileage. Remember the benefits will only be delivered if you can maintain the increase for a period of time, be patient.

If you are an intermediate or advanced runner with little history of injury then you can push greater mileage with confidence. Increase mileage to a point where you can maintain the increase for 3-4 weeks without suffering fatigue or burnout. If you do feel you are starting to burnout then you’ve increased too quickly and may need to plateau or decrease.

Incorporating regular rest days into your schedule will help you avoid burnout or fatigue. We recommend not planning rest days and using these when you feel you need to rest. This helps you avoid burnout and injury as you rest when the mind or body says no, and run when you are motivated, ready and willing.

When you increase mileage you should be attempting to create a new normal for yourself that over a period of weeks feels normal. Therefore you should only increase to what you feel you can capably sustain. If you achieve this you certainly give yourself a better chance of remaining injury free.

You’ll get great benefits over time by increasing your mileage, you’ll get even greater benefits over time by remaining injury free and enjoying your running.


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Running hills, Yes please

Running hills regularly is one sure fire way to improve your marathon result and almost all aspects of your running performance. Regular hill workouts will give you gains in strength, speed, endurance and injury prevention. Every runner will benefit from running hills no matter whether you started running last week or are a seasoned veteran.

Hills are a member of the three key sessions we recommend runners run each week. If you want to be a self coached runner and keep your training cycle simple, run a focused hill, interval and a long run each week mixed with aerobic recovery runs.

Whilst most marathons are run on flat courses designed to offer runners a chance at a fast time, the benefits from regular hills give you the chance to improve even further.

Hill Workouts

We are here to talk about hills today and why they should be a regular part of your training schedule. There are many ways to add hill running specifics into your runs but three simple and easy to additions are;

  • Hill sprints – Short explosive effort uphill followed by a downhill walk recovery. These are usually 10-15 second efforts and can be included at the end of an aerobic run.
  • Hill repeats – Run the hill with a focus on a medium hard effort followed by a recovery run down the hill. Varying the length, gradient and number of repeats can add variety to this session.
  • Hilly Tempo runs – Choose a hilly terrain and run a focussed tempo session over a hilly terrain for 45-60 minutes. To aide recovery during the run you can run the uphills harder then the downhills.

Running hills regularly builds leg strength specific to running which helps every aspect of your running. This gives you benefits of speed and endurance that are vital to improving your performance over every distance. Being stronger gives you a better chance to avoid injury.

If you are training for an upcoming marathon you should be running a hill repeat or hilly tempo at least weekly, particularly in the early phase of the training when you are building strength and your aerobic base fitness. Later in your program you may want to run sessions more specific to your goal race, but for at least the first eight weeks hills should be a weekly part of your life.

If you want to make hills part of your training schedule commit one day each week for hills. If you are new to hills start with hill sprints at the end of a run. When you feel ready add a more challenging specific hill session to your week, to start pick an easier hill for repeats before moving to steeper or longer hills. This session may just become your favourite session of the week.

 


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Stop planning your rest days

 

Most runners would agree that rest days are a valuable part of the training process as they are allow you time to recover from the stress that running causes on your body and mind. The frequency that rest days are used will vary between runner’s ability and experience. Elite runners may rarely take a rest day whereas a beginner runner may need 2-3 each week.

How you structure your running can be beneficial to get the best out of the training. For that reason we recommend to stop planning rest days into your training schedule. For most runners rest days are needed but every runner’s life is different and things can happen that stop you running. When this happens, take a rest day.

Planning to run every day and resting when feel you need to is a better plan. If you have pressures from work or family life that get in the way of running then take a rest day. If you start to feel a niggling injury and feel you need a day off, take a rest day.

Advantages to not planning rest days

  • More flexibility for when you run
  • Less pressure to run when you can’t
  • Less likely to run through pain
  • You’ll run more miles and improve

Quite simply things can get in the way of running and when they do you can take a rest day. When rest days are unplanned you have more flexibility around when you get out the door to run.

When your rest days are unplanned you have the ability to look after yourself when a niggling injury happens. Take a rest day get the body right and run again the day after. For this reason you’ll be less likely to run through pain and do further injury to yourself.

What culminates from an unplanned approach is you are able to run with more regularity and when you run you are motivated to run. When rest days are planned your structure is rigid and you can’t afford to take a rest day when the need arises. Keep them unplanned and you’ll run more and be more motivated on the times you run. This will help you run more mileage in the long term and this will improve you as a runner.

The most effective way to structure your weekly training is to plan days for your three key sessions   – these being your long run, interval session and hill repeats. These should be planned for days that give you the best chance to complete them, if things get in the way then being flexible and changing them is fine. Try not to run these sessions on consecutive days though. The remainder of the week will be scheduled for aerobic or recovery running and when a rest day is needed take it and adjust the week accordingly.

An unplanned rest approach takes the pressure off you to get out the door when time constraints, life or injury gets in the way. After all it’s supposed to be fun. Enjoy your running


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The benefits of increasing running mileage

“An unaimed arrow never hits it target”

This is also true when it comes to running and a structured plan to get the most out of your running mileage is important. Increasing running mileage helps develop your aerobic capacity so you are better able to handle harder sessions and also run faster over longer distances. Increasing running mileage helps you translate times over shorter distances to longer races. Theoretically if you can run 20 min for 5km you should be able to run a 3:15 marathon, however this doesn’t always happen and building aerobic capacity over time is what can make this a reality.

Benefits of more mileage

  • Building your aerobic capacity

Building your aerobic capacity means building your endurance. The most important factor in becoming a better distance runner. Most running programs feature a lot of aerobic running with harder workouts littered through them. Building aerobic capacity is the number one thing you can do to improve your running and the best way to do this is to increase your mileage at an aerobic pace.

  • Increasing running efficiency

Improving your aerobic capacity will like help you run more efficiently, meaning you’ll be able to run further or faster using less energy. The more you run the better more efficient runner you’ll become. Increasing running is not the only factor in improving running efficiency but certainly one.

  • Prepare you for fatigue in race

When you increase your mileage you deal with fatigue regularly when you train. Your weekly long run even when you are not in a preparation phase for a race is the best run to prepare you for race fatigue. You’ll be better prepared to deal with challenging periods of races when you’ve done greater mileage.

  • Build resilience and mental toughness

When you’ve done the hard work in training you are better equipped to deal with tough patches in races and become resilient and mentally tough. When it’s time to dig deep in a race it takes mental toughness to convince yourself you can still run your best. Mileage in the bank helps prepare you to be mentally tough.

  • Race faster

Quite simply the result of all the benefits listed is better racing results.

How to increase mileage

  • Have a structured plan

Think about the time you have available to run and structure your training around this time. Give yourself the best opportunity to fit running into your schedule.

  • Consistent long runs

Even when you are not in a race preparation phase you should complete a weekly aerobic long run. The most valuable run you will do to increase mileage and your aerobic capacity.

  • Increase runs by 5 – 10 minutes

Increasing your easy runs by 5-10 mins may give you 1-2km per run more which adds up over time. Will it really affect you if you set the alarm 10 minutes earlier.

  • Run an extra day per week

If you can fit an extra run into your schedule if you can. Keep this run as an easy recovery run rather then a rest day. The miles will help you in the long run. If you can’t fit another day in thats ok too.

There is no magic number on miles that every runner should be doing, this is individual and there are too many factors to list.  However almost everyone has the ability and can benefit from a small and measured increase in miles. Run well.


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Interview with a runner – Amanda Moore

Amanda Moore is a runner from Dallas, Texas. Amanda is a very good runner with an impressive list of personal bests. Amanda runs in a combination of her Vibram Five fingers and minimal racing flats and is also a high mileage runner putting in some big mileage weeks through the extremes of the Texas summers and winters.

Amanda’s list of personal best times are as follows;

5k 19:01
10k 40:32
8 mile 52:12
15k 1:01:40
Half 1:29:17
Full 3:26:50

Amanda was kind enough to answer a few questions about her running.

How long have you been running, and how did you start?

I ran track at a young age and had much success in the 400 meters, the 800 meters, and high jump at both a State and National level, but a stress fracture and life threw me off track which ultimately ended my track career. It didn’t, however, change the fact that running was in my blood, so, years later in 2011, when I read the book Born to Run, I felt driven to get out there and start again. At 25 years old, I began my journey as a long distance runner. I started out slow and ran only a few miles at a time. After a couple of months, I signed up for a half marathon and gradually began increasing my weekly mileage. Looking back, when I signed up for the half, I was hooked.

What running achievement are you most proud of?

Tough question… I am most proud of my first sub 1:30 half marathon in December 2015. I set the goal of running sub 1:30 by the end of the year in January 2015. I trained hard, raced hard, and pushed myself all year to reach that goal. At that time, my long distance running career had included no formal training, no coach, no written out training plans or race strategies. When I crossed the finish line in 1:29:44, I was so overwhelmed with emotion that I cried. Reaching that goal meant so much to me, and while that is not my fastest time, or “biggest” achievement, that is the achievement I am most proud of.

What is your biggest tip to becoming a successful runner?

Believe you can. Work hard. And don’t give up!

What is your favourite training session?

It’s a toss up between Summer and Fall, but I think I’ll go with summer. I love to sweat, and I love working hard. Summer in Texas is no joke. It’s hot. It’s humid. Sometimes a break from the heat is nice, but overall, it’s my favorite training season because I know I am putting in hard work that will pay off in the fall racing season. Most of the summer is base training for me which includes hill repeats, 200 meter repeats, relatively short tempo runs, 16-20 mile long runs, 5k’s, and high weekly mileage (60-80 miles per week on average).

How do you stay motivated when you don’t want to run?

I think of my goals and remind myself that I feel better when I stay on track. Most of the time, if I just get out there and start to run, the hesitation, doubt, and dread fade away, and the desire to run kicks back in.

What are your favourite running shoes?

New Balance Hanzo Racing Flats, Vibram Five Fingers KSO Evo, Mizuno Wave Universe 5. All minimalist shoes! I currently race and train the most in the New Balance Hanzo Racing Flats.

What are your goals for the future?

As for time goals…to run a sub 3:00 Marathon, a 1:20 Half Marathon, and a sub 19:00 5k
Another goal of mine is to place in the top 3 in a Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series Half or Full.

Thanks for your time Amanda.

If you want to follow Amanda’s running journey you can find her training and racing logged on her blog at irunelite.com. Amanda is honest and open in her blog and it is always entertaining reading.

You can also catch her on Facebook at I am a Runner, Instagram at @irunelite.com and Strava under Amanda Moore.

Thanks again to Amanda for her time and good luck with your running goals in the future.

 


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3 Tips to improving your running performance

When looking to improve your running performance small changes can make a big difference. Here are three well tried tips to improve your running performance before your next race goal.

Mileage Matters

If you want to improve running one of the easiest things to do is increase mileage. Being able to run further in a race preparation will give you great benefits. This does not mean you need to run more hard sessions and the recommendation is to avoid these. Running more should be more running at an aerobic pace to build your aerobic capacity.

A few ways you can increase your mileage are;

Increase your easy runs by 5 – 10 min. If you run four easy runs per week this may mean you add 5-10km to your weekly mileage which doesn’t sound a lot but over a 16 week marathon preparation this could add 160km of aerobic building running to your fitness. Can be as easy as getting up 10 min earlier or not looking at your smartphone notifications that you’ve accumulated overnight until after your run and get out the door running earlier

Run an extra day a week or run twice a day. If you currently four days a week add a day and run five. If you have an opportunity in your schedule to at times run twice in a day, go for it. These extra miles you’ve run will be valuable when they add up. Only do these if you have the time in your schedule though, there is no need to force yourself out the door. It’s supposed to be fun and if it’s not then use the time to rest more

If you can use any of these ways to give yourself a small increase in your weekly miles they will help you over the long term.

 

Get Stronger

The pace required to run a 3 hour marathon is not difficult, for most runners the pace of 6:52 min/mile is a fast jog and easily manageable. What is very difficult though is running this pace for 26.2 miles and it takes strength to do this. Being able to run at a fast perceived pace when the body fatigues is what makes running difficult.

Building strength so that the body can perform at a high level through fatigue is often neglected yet vitally important. To improve strength we suggest a weekly hill repeats session and a strength program of both body weight and explosive weighted exercises.

Hill repeats are part of our recommended three key sessions that every runner should do weekly to build strength. Trying to run these on the same day each week will build them into a habit, that when repeated will become a part of your routine. Be ready to change up from time to time when life gets in the way. To get the best results this should be a hard session so do them when the body is well rested and ready to be stressed.

In terms of strength programs its best advised to consult a personal trainer in your area to recommend a strength program for you that incorporates running specific weight training and ensure you use the right technique to perform these exercises. A strength routine of 1-2 times a week should give you a great benefit to your running.

Correct training paces.

Speed work or interval sessions are supposed to be difficult. They are meant to challenge you so be prepared to run them hard.

Whether you aim to hit a certain pace or use perceived effort as a measure of intensity is up to you but be prepared for them to challenge you. If you intend to hit a pace use an online calculator to give you the correct paces to hit and go after them. These are designed to build speed, so they need to be specific to your ability and run accordingly.

Running interval sessions based on perceived effort will allow these to be purely individual but you’ll need to be honest with yourself when applying this effort. Be prepared to work hard and give your best effort.

Running these regularly will build speed and the ability to run a faster pace then comfortable when fatigued. Training at the correct pace for you gives you the best way to improve your speed quicker.

Until next time. Run well

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How to prepare for preparing for a marathon

Whether you are new to the marathon or a seasoned marathoner searching for a new personal best, being prepared for the training to come is essential. For some preparing for a marathon will simply mean increasing your mileage to prepare for the 42.2km on race day. While for others it will mean increasing mileage further than you’ve ever run and this may seem daunting. Here are three tips to do prior to your marathon training beginning to give you the best chance at a successful marathon training load.

1. Prepare to adjust your mileage

Whether you regularly run marathons or are preparing or your first you are likely to not be regularly doing marathon specific training. Being prepared to increase your mileage is important.

Is your body ready to cope with more mileage? With most coaches and runners structuring a 14-16 week marathon program you can use the 2-4 weeks before this begins to assess where your mileage is and begin to increase. Try and understand whether you are ready to increase your mileage. If you aren’t be mindful for the first half of the program and be cautious with every week that the total mileage or the long run gets significantly longer. The old rule of not increasing weekly mileage by more than 10% still applies and can be used to monitor. The weeks before the program begins are ideal weeks to set small goals to ensure you are prepared for your marathon preparation to start.

How will your life cope with an increase in mileage? Another aspect of preparing for a marathon is that you will likely spend more time running. Are your family and work life ready for the increase and how will you fit the extra time in

2. Prepare for your training paces

This tip is for those looking to run their best time in a marathon. In the weeks leading up to a marathon preparation to gauge where your fitness is currently and then prepare your interval or tempo workout goal paces around this current fitness levels.

In the weeks before your marathon preparation starts you can run a time trial over whatever distance you feel comfortable with 3-5km is perfect to gauge your fitness. From here you can use this time to enter into one of the many running calculators on the internet and gauge your times. In our opinion the McMillan Running calculator is the best available as it will give you individual training paces specific to your goal.

Using this information can be a great place to assess where your fitness is and what you need to do to do your best in your marathon.

3.Figure out your schedule

Whether you are accessing a quality running coach or self structuring your training having a schedule that fits into your life is crucial. To give you the best chance at your marathon fitting in the key workouts is important.

Scheduling how many days you plan to run and which days you will do your key workouts will give you the best shot at success. Making sure you have a plan in place for when you will run your long run and harder sessions each week. And also having a plan to reschedule if life or weather or other factors get in the way. Committing to and completing these sessions each week should be part of the schedule.

Figuring out your schedule is a vital piece of the puzzle to get you ready to run your best marathon.

 

 

There are many other things that form the pieces of a marathon preparation, these are just three that you can do prior to your scheduled training starting.

If you have any questions or comments on your own marathon training leave a comment.

 

Cheruiyot v Keitany: How important is marathon pacing?

A look at two of the leading protagonists in the London Marathon shows the importance of pacing to run your best marathon time. While Mary Keitany set out at world record pace in London, Vivian Cheruiyot ran a more controlled and consistent race to ultimately take the win.

A look at each ladies 5km splits tells the story.

                                            Keitany                                                  Cheruiyot

5km                               15:46                                                   16:15

10km                             16:00                                                   16:38

15km                             16:00                                                   16:25

20km                             16:04                                                   16:13

25km                             16:34                                                   16:25

30km                             16:39                                                   16:23

35km                             17:33                                                    16:29

40km                             19:47                                                    16:20

42.2km                          2:24:27                                                2:18:31

1st half/2nd half           67:16/77:11                                          68:56/69:35

These splits tell a story about both ladies, firstly a brave decision by Keitany to go out at world record pace and as the second fastest lady in history it is an obvious goal to break Paula Radcliffe’s world record. Also a brave decision by Cheruiyot not to go with Keitany and Dibaba through the first 5km and run her own pace. Cheruiyot is the current Olympic champion at 5000m running 14:29 to win in Rio so no doubt could have stayed with the lead pace. The decision to be controlled and run a consistent pace over the entire marathon paid dividends in the end.

At 20km Cheruiyot was 1:41 behind Keitany and from there she started to close the gap, overtaking Ketiany after 35km. Cheruiyot’s 39 sec positive split was run on a warm day in London. A very patient and well paced race by Cheruiyot, running a pace that she could consistently hold for the 42.2km from the start of the marathon till the end.

How can the average runner benefit Cheruiyot’s pacing example?

There are two lessons here that average runners can take away.

  1. Consistent pacing is the key

The best marathon results are achieved by consistent pacing throughout the entire marathon. Cheruiyot’s marathon in London is a perfect example of marathon pacing. Her first 5km split is just 5 sec faster then her 35-40km split when the race was there to win. To run a 40sec positive split on a warm day in a 5 minute personal best means she was controlled and patient early and gave her best effort in the latter stages of the race.

This strategy can be replicated by every runner trying to achieve their goals. Be patient and controlled and when the marathon asks for your best effort you’ll be in a position to give it.

2. Know your goal pace is achievable on the day

If consistent pacing throughout the marathon is the goal you need to know your goal is achievable. If your best marathon is a 3:35 then attempting to break 3 hours may be unachievable. You may be able to run 3 hour marathon pace for a good part of the marathon but when it gets tough your pace will ultimately fall away and the last quarter of the marathon is most likely a painful experience. Cheruiyot clearly didn’t believe she could run world record pace for 42.2km, she did believe she could run sub 2:20 and paced her race perfectly to do this and ultimately win the race.

The other part to this is adjusting your goal if the conditions aren’t ideal. It was warm in London and a lot of runners suffered on the day due to the heat. Perhaps Keitany should have adjusted her expectation with the warm weather. Adjust your goal if necessary.

Pacing is an important part of running to any distance, learning this skill and be realistic about your goals and paces can help you achieve your goals and ensure your enjoy your race day experiences.

happy pacing, happy running

Coolcore Multi Chill – Product Review

The Multi Chill by Australian brand Coolcore is a versatile, multi-functional headwear item suitable for all types of outdoor sports and leisure activities. Coolcore advertise 12 different ways that the Multi chill can be worn that offer a suitable headwear item for all climates. The secret to the Multi chill and the other products offered by Coolcore is the fabric which claims to use a technology to keep you cooler, drier and more comfortable with a competitive advantage. If you would like to know more about the technology in their fabric visit coolcore.com.au for more details, there is a comprehensive explanation of the technology in the fabric provided.

I have been testing the Multi Chill for 6-8 weeks on a variety of my runs over differing weather. I wanted to test the product on both hot and cooler days and see if the fabric really did cool me during my runs. During these runs I have  used the Multi Chill in a variety of the 12 styles however predominantly the sweatband, saharine and bandana styles.

The main question I wanted to answer was, does the fabric provide a cooling effect? From my first few runs wearing the Multi Chill it was apparent that this is true, I could feel the fabric cooling my head as my body started to heat. The result wasn’t a huge cooling effect but certainly enough to feel a noticeable difference when running. These initial runs were all in mild weather in the early morning.

Using the Multi Chill under hotter condition and runs under direct sunlight, I was surprised to find the cooling effect is greater then the milder conditions. This seems to be when the fabric performs best, during these runs as my body and head heated the fabric again provides the cooling effect. The feeling is not extreme, but rather a noticeable cooling of the head. This also has the benefit of you staying drier, as the Multi Chill absorbs sweat from running the head and hair definitely stay drier and helps keep you comfortable while running.

If you are looking at the Multi Chill or other products from Coolcore and expecting a huge cooling effect in hot conditions then you may be disappointed. However the fabric used by Coolcore will provide relief from the heat of the sun and the natural heating of the body during exercise.

Using the Multi Chill at night in cooler conditions is also a positive experience. Using in the bandana method allows for warmth in the beginning of the run and as the body heats up the head remains comfortable. I haven’t been able to use the Multi Chill in very cold conditions yet however I don’t see any problems as the Multi Chill can be worn in a way to provide warmth and also the fabric’s cooling will happen when the body heats during the run.

If you are looking for a multi-functional headwear item for running or other sporting activity, I don’t see any weakness in the Coolcore Multi Chill. The claims that Coolcore make in regards to their fabric are accurate and the Multi Chill is comfortable to wear for long periods of time. It’s a welcome addition to my running accessories collection

The Multi Chill sells for AUD $19.95 plus $6.95 shipping within Australia. This is well priced against other products in this space with not many staking claim to the cooling effect that Coolcore offers. Coolcore has a range of products all using the same fabric, check them out at coolcore.com.au for more details.

 

 

 

*Disclaimer: Coolcore provided a Multi Chill without charge for the purpose of this review.